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Welcome to our Politike series! From today, OxPol will publish a selection of articles from Politikea Brazilian website associated with the magazine CartaCapitalPolitike will also be publishing articles from OxPol, which will be available at http://politike.cartacapital.com.br/oxpol/.

Politike focuses on the analysis of international affairs and human rights issues, especially those of the Global South. In its first year, Politike reached over 400,000 page views. CartaCapital is one of the most popular political magazines in Brazil, with its website registering over 6.5 million monthly page views. The magazine also has a strong presence on social media, with 1.6 million followers on Facebook and over 1 million on Twitter.

Politike publishes its articles on the ‘OxPol: The Oxford University Politics Blog’ website as part of a collaboration between OxPol and Politike.  The collaboration does not imply an endorsement by Politike of any content on the OxPol website.

Photo credit: Senado Federal (Flickr:CC BY-NC 2.0)

The historical defeat of Dilma Rousseff on 17 April, when more than two-thirds of Brazil’s lower House of Congress voted to oust the country’s first female president, is not the end of the debate about whether she committed a crime that would constitutionally justify her impeachment. The opposition claims that the president, elected with more than fifty-four million votes, used accounting tricks to artificially lower the government’s budget deficit. Her supporters argue that other Brazilian presidents have used the same strategy before. The final word on the impeachment motion will be given shortly by the Senate, but at the end …

A cornered government, a legislative short of legitimacy, a contaminated judiciary and polarised protesters put Brazilian institutional balance to the test. Immoral deals, Machiavellian manoeuvres and outright dishonesty. No wonder comparisons between Brazilian politics and the American TV show House of Cards are tempting and widespread. Even Netflix made the connection to promote the release of its fourth series in Brazil. This clever marketing initiative prompted Maurício Santoro, a political scientist, to joke on Twitter that “Netflix is the only institution enjoying the trust and esteem of Brazilians these days.” But Brazil’s plight is not fiction, and the quip accompanies …

As any country with a minimally functioning democracy, Brazil has an ambivalent relationship with its mass media. And as in all countries with a minimally functioning market economy, Brazilian mass media have been disrupted by personalised digital platforms. Understanding To two elements, and how they became entangled, is essential if we are to grasp the role of the media in the social turmoil that has engulfed Brazil in the past year or so. But in spite of their deep flaws, newspapers and broadcasters cannot be blamed for the toxic political environment that has taken over the country.

Fourth nuclear test re-energises bellicose tone against the US and South Korea A few announcements made by North Korea in the past two months have been making the international community uneasy. Last January, the country said it had successfully carried out a hydrogen bomb (H-bomb) test as an ‘act of self-defence’ against the US, claiming to have gained the capability to ‘wipe out the whole US territory’. In February, Kim Jong-un’s regime launched a satellite into space in a movement considered by specialists as a cover up for a ballistic missile test. Albeit Pyongyang tends to overstate its accomplishments, the satellite launch …