Author Archive

Cristina Parau

Dr. Cristina Parau is an Associate Member of the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University specialising in Comparative Politics. Her latest research inquired into the evolution of non-majoritarian institutions under the influence of transnational elite networks, and their effects on majoritarian institutions. The infiltration into Europe of US ideas about the Judiciary has unexpectedly become normalised yet is still not sufficiently understood, including their normative implications for democracy and the rule of law. Recently, Dr. Parau has turned to the causal interactions between knowledge, ideology, and the political stratagems of competing actor-constellations who are seeking to influence energy transitions in Europe and beyond.

"Scales of Justice Brisbane Supreme Court" by Sheba

This is a brief reply to the review of my monograph, Transnational Networks and Elite Self-Empowerment: The Making of the Judiciary in Contemporary Europe and Beyond (OUP 2019) by LSE Human Rights Prof. Conor Gearty, Vice-President of the British Academy. I am grateful to Prof. Gearty for reviewing my monograph at such length. I am replying here in hopes that the exchange may advance our understanding of outstanding questions about Judiciary institutional design (and designers)—a topic that receives insufficient attention.  This is a summary of my full reply to Gearty, which is accessible here. Gearty and other critics are invited to rebut my challenges to the legitimacy and desirability of the judicialisation of politics. First, I will try to summarise …

The first issue concerning a written constitution for Britain is: Where is the demand coming from? Contemporary organised demand for constitutional reform traces back to the late 1970s, yet even before then, isolated intellectuals – ‘a voice crying in the wilderness’ – had tried to make an issue out of a written constitution for Britain that would include a Bill of Rights. The term ‘norm entrepreneur’ is sometimes used in politics and international relations to refer to pioneers who, dissatisfied with the status quo, take action to change it at their own initiative. They may make an impression on the world even if their personal cause ultimately fails. A norm entrepreneur is typically an individual, but may be a collective actor …